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Kapi Jātaka (No.250, 404)

1. Kapi Jātaka (No.250).– Once when the Bodhisatta was living the ascetic life in the Himavā, his wife having died, a monkey came in the rainy weather to the hermitage clad in an anchorite’s robe which he had found in the forest. The Bodhisatta recognised the monkey and drove him away.

The story was told in reference to a hypocritical brother. J.ii.268 ff

2. Kapi Jātaka (No.404).– Once the Bodhisatta and Devadatta were both born as monkeys. One day a mischievous monkey took his seat on the arch which was over the gateway to the park and, when the king’s chaplain passed under the arch, he let excrement fall on his head, and, on the chaplain looking up, even into his mouth. The chaplain swore vengeance on the monkeys, and the Bodhisatta, hearing of it, counselled them to seek residence elsewhere. His advice was followed by all except the monkey, who was Devadatta, and a few of his followers. Sometime after, the king’s elephants were burnt through a fire breaking out in their stalls. A goat had eaten some rice put out to dry and was beaten with a torch; his hair caught fire and the fire spread to the stalls. The chaplain, seizing his opportunity, told the elephant-doctors that the best remedy for burns was monkey-fat, and five hundred monkeys in the royal gardens were slain by archers for the sake of their fat.

The story was told in reference to Devadatta being swallowed up by the earth. J.iii.355 f; cp. Kāka Jātaka.

3. Kapi Jātaka.– See the Mahākapi Jātaka.

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