Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Questions regarding A Manual of Respiration
#1
So today I read through the book A Manual of Respiration, it is one of the best books I read on Anapanasati and I've read a lot, including ones by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.

This part in particular grabbed my attention:


Quote:If one practises according to the counting method, the connection method, and the fixing method (where access concentration and attainment concentration are entered), one fulfils the four foundations of mindfulness and the seven factors of enlightenment. However, if one does so with an inclination towards the Deva and Brahma existences after death, the seven factors of enlightenment become dependent on the cycle of rebirths. If one stops short with the attainment of access concentration, attainment concentration, and contemplation of impermanence, one is liable to become inclined towards depending on the cycle of rebirths. Hence, depending on seclusion, dispassion, cessation, and relinquishment mean putting forth effort with a view to attaining the stopping of rebirth in this very life and not stopping short with such attainments as access concentration and attainment concentration. Stopping rebirth means nibbāna.



So before I went on my Mahasi retreat last summer, I would get into the Jhanas, enjoy them, maybe attain a few insights, and end it there. Is this what Ledi means when he says

"If one stops short with the attainment of access concentration, attainment concentration, and contemplation of impermanence, one is liable to become inclined towards depending on the cycle of rebirths. "

It is not enough to even contemplate on impermanence, one must go further and contemplate dispassion, cessation and relinquishment?

From now on, when I return to anapanasati meditation I will always try to end my meditation with these contemplations. Is there any material that expands on dispassion, cessation and relinquishment and how one should contemplate them?

Dispassion makes sense to me, like a sort of indifference, but what does "relinquishment" mean exactly?

What does "to perceive them with wisdom" mean? Does perceive mean to imagine? and wisdom to compare/discern?

In general, I get the gist of where I am lacking and what I should prioritize from here on out, any more resources and materials on this is appreciated.

I think at the end of the day it all comes down to seeing the 5 aggregates first hand, correct me if I'm wrong.
Reply
#2
Relinquishment (vossagga) in the context of insight meditation means giving up continued existence. A typical stock passage is found in the Mahāsakuludāyi Suttaṃ (M.ii.12) where the Buddha teaches how his disciples develop the seven enlightenment factors:

‘‘Puna caparaṃ, udāyi, akkhātā mayā sāvakānaṃ paṭipadā, yathāpaṭipannā me sāvakā sattabojjhaṅge bhāventi. Idhudāyi, bhikkhu satisambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ; dhammavicayasambojjhaṅgaṃ bhāveti…pe…

"And again, Udāyi, I have proclaimed to my disciples the way to practice the seven enlightenment factors. Here, a bhikkhu, develops the enlightenment factor of mindfulness supported by seclusion [from the hindrances], supported by dispassion, supported by cessation [of craving], and resulting in relinquishment [of becoming]. He develops the enlightenment factor of investigation ...
NewsDPPN  • Fonts • MirrorCST4 Tipitaka
Reply
#3
On the difference between perception and wisdom. From the Visuddhimagga:

In what sense is it understanding? It is understanding (paññā) in the sense of act of understanding (pajānana). What is this act of understanding? It is knowing (jānana) in a particular mode separate from the modes of perceiving (sañjānana) and cognizing (vijānana). [437] For though the state of knowing (jānana-bhāva) is equally present in perception (saññā), in consciousness (viññāṇa), and in understanding (paññā), nevertheless perception is only the mere perceiving of an object as, say, blue or yellow; it cannot bring about the penetration of its characteristics as impermanent, painful, and not-self. Consciousness knows the objects as blue or yellow, and it brings about the penetration of its characteristics, but it cannot bring about, by endeavouring, the manifestation of the [supramundane] path. Understanding knows the object in the way already stated, it brings about the penetration of the characteristics, and it brings about, by endeavouring, the manifestation of the path.

Suppose there were three people, a child without discretion, a villager, and a money-changer, who saw a heap of coins lying on a money-changer’s counter. The child without discretion knows merely that the coins are figured and ornamented, long, square or round; he does not know that they are reckoned as valuable for human use and enjoyment. And the villager knows that they are figured and ornamented, etc., and that they are reckoned as valuable for human use and enjoyment; but he does not know such distinctions as, “This one is genuine, this is false, this is half-value.” The money-changer knows all those kinds, and he does so by looking at the coin, and by listening to the sound of it when struck, and by smelling its smell, tasting its taste, and weighing it in his hand, and he knows that it was made in a certain village or town or city or on a certain mountain or by a certain master. And this may be understood as an illustration.

Perception is like the child without discretion seeing the coin, because it apprehends the mere mode of appearance of the object as blue and so on. Consciousness is like the villager seeing the coin, because it apprehends the mode of the object as blue, etc., and because it extends further, reaching the penetration of its characteristics. Understanding is like the money-changer seeing the coin, because, after apprehending the mode of the object as blue, etc., and extending to the penetration of the characteristics, it extends still further, reaching the manifestation of the path.
NewsDPPN  • Fonts • MirrorCST4 Tipitaka
Reply
#4
Thank you very much, that clears up the difference between perception, consciousness, and understanding. I'll need to read the entire visuddhimagga, seems like it has all the answers Tongue  I heard that Way of Mindfulness by Soma Thera is also a key reading.

I take it repeat exposure and experience with an object is what develops the knowledge from perception to consciousness and finally to understanding.

Thanks again Bhante
Reply
#5
The way that I understand the process is that as one keeps on observing mental and physical phenomena, the perception of impermanence becomes more distinct while the perception of continuity dissolves. Likewise, the perception of suffering becomes more distinct while the perception of happiness dissolves, and the perception of not-self becomes more distinct as the perception of self dissolves.

From the perception of the three characteristics, one becomes dispassionate towards and disenchanted with mental and physical phenomena, then the higher stages of insight will gradually develop:  Knowledge of Dissolution (bhaṅga-ñāṇa), Awareness of Fearfulness (bhayatupaṭṭhāna-ñāṇa), Knowledge of Misery (ādīnava-ñāṇa),  Knowledge of Disgust (nibbidā-ñāṇa),  Knowledge of Desire for Deliverance (muñcitukamyatā-ñāṇa), and so on. To reach these higher stages of insight one will have to keep on striving hard with the determination to gain insight. If one stops meditating, or diverts to enjoying blissful jhānic states, or the corruptions of insight, the progress of insight will stop and may also regress. No matter, all efforts on the preliminary path of insight are fruitful. If one does the work, one will get the results that one deserves.

Depending on one's perfections, determination, and effort, the progress of insight can be very slow or extremely rapid, but in either case, much previous development on  the preliminary path of insight is required. We can read many instances in the texts where someone just meditates for a few weeks and gains Arahantship. Moggallāna took only one week, while Sāriputta took two weeks. Bāhiya did it the quickest in a matter of seconds, while as the Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta states, some take seven years while others achieve it in seven days.  

Nowadays, it might be seventy years for most meditators, or several lifetimes.
NewsDPPN  • Fonts • MirrorCST4 Tipitaka
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
000webhost logo