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Daddara Jātaka (No.172, 304, 438)

1. Daddara Jātaka (No.172).– Once the Bodhisatta was a lion and dwelt with his retinue in Rajataguhā, while in a neighbouring cave lived a jackal. One day, when the lions were roaring and playing about, the jackal tried to imitate them and the lions became silent for very shame.

The story was told in reference to Kokālika who, trying to imitate the eloquence of the learned monks of Manosilā, failed miserably. The jackal is identified with Kokālika. J.ii.65 ff.

2. Daddara Jātaka (No.304).– Once the Bodhisatta was born among the Nāgā in Daddarapabbata. He was called Mahādaddara, his father being Sūradaddara and his brother Cūḷadaddara. Cūḷadaddara was passionate and cruel and teased the Nāga maidens; the king wished to expel him, but he was saved by Mahādaddara. However, at last the king was very angry and sent them both for three years to Bārāṇasī. There the boys ill-treated them, but when Cūḷadaddara tried to kill them his brother urged him to practise patience.

The story was related in reference to a choleric monk who is identified with Cūḷadaddara. J.iii.15 ff.

3. Daddara Jātaka (No.438).– Once in Bārāṇasī was a famous teacher who retired into the forest. Men came from all parts to learn from him and brought him many presents. He had in his house a tame partridge, who, by listening to the teacher’s exposition, learnt the three Vedas by heart. A tame lizard and a cow were given as presents to the teacher. When the teacher died, his students were in despair, but were reassured by the partridge who taught them what he knew. One day a wicked ascetic came to the hermitage and, in the absence of the students, killed the partridge, the young lizard and the cow. The partridge had two friends, a lion and a tiger, who killed the murderer.

The ascetic was Devadatta, the lizard Kisāgotamī, the tiger Mahā-Moggallāna, the lion Sāriputta, the teacher Mahā-Kassapa, and the partridge the Bodhisatta.

The story was related in reference to Devadatta’s attempts to kill the Buddha. J.iii.536 f.

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