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Arahanta Sutta

1. Arahanta Sutta.– Would an Arahant by speaking of “I” and “mine” show thereby proneness to notions of self or soul? The Buddha says “No.” He would thereby only conform to common usage in such matters (S.i.14‑15).

Buddhaghosa says that the question was asked by a forest devatā who had heard forest-dwelling Arahants talk thus. She was worried by the question as to whether they had any conceit (māna) at all. (SA.i.41).

2. Paṭhama, Dutiya Arahanta Sutta.– Of all the forms of becoming, the Arahants have the best in all the worlds. They attain this by right insight with regard to the mental formations (saṅkhāra) (S.iii.82‑4).

3. Arahanta Sutta.– An Arahant is one who has really seen the arising, ending, etc., of the five aggregates of attachment (upādānakkhandhā). S.iii.161.

4. Arahanta Sutta.– Taught to Rādha at Sāvatthi. An Arahant is one who has really seen the arising, ending, etc., of the five aggregates of attachment (upādānakkhandhā). S.iii.193.

5. Paṭhama Arahanta Sutta.– That noble disciple who fully knows the satisfaction in, the misery of, the escape from, the five controlling-faculties (indriya) is an Arahant. (S.v.194).

6. Dutiya Arahanta Sutta.– That bhikkhu who fully knows the satisfaction in, the misery of, the escape from, the five controlling-faculties (indriya) is an Arahant. (S.v.194).

7. Arahanta Sutta.– There are six faculties — the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind. A monk who knows the arising, cessation, satisfaction, misery, and escape from these six faculties is an Arahant. (S.v.205).

8. Arahanta Sutta.– There are five faculties — pain, pleasure, happiness, sorrow, and equanimity. A monk who knows the arising, cessation, satisfaction, misery, and escape from these five faculties is an Arahant. (S.v.207).

9. Arahanta Sutta.– Arahants, fully enlightened ones, have full understanding of the Four Noble Truths as they really are. S.v.433.

10. Arahatta Sutta.– Abandoning six qualities definitely leads to Arahantship — sloth (thinaṃ), torpor (middhaṃ), restlessness (uddhaccaṃ), remorse (kukkuccaṃ), lack of faith (assaddhiyaṃ), heedlessness (pamādaṃ). (A.iii.421).

1. Arahanta Vagga.– The first chapter of the Brāhmaṇa Saṃyutta of the Saṃyuttanikāya. (S.i.160‑72).

2. Arahanta Vagga.– The seventh section of the Dhammapada.

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